Expanding the breath of host-microbe studies

Overview

Our understanding of host-microbe interactions is known in great depth from a very few number of “simple” study systems (i.e., squid-vibrio, lucinid clams, Atlantic killfish, Olavius oligochaete) and a larger number of foundation species (i.e., corals, sponges). Assuming that between 0.3 and 2.2 million metazoan species live in the ocean, our knowledge about host-microbe interactions is based upon 0.03% and 0.004% of all marine host species only (they fall in 5 out of 32 phyla living in the ocean).

Expanding the breath of host-microbe studies On what taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional groups should future studies on symbiosis be focusing and why?

Discussion Questions

What have we learned from these systems?

Why are some systems being studied more than others?

On what taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional groups should future studies on symbiosis be focusing and why?

Play a game with the group: If you could pick 10 organisms to study, how would you pick them? Why?

Can we study hosts in aquaria without disrupting their symbioses, or are field studies necessary?

How can a system be studied with a more systematic approach? How deep do you have to study a system? Where should we prioritize research?

Outcomes

Schedule

0630-0730 Breakfast

0800–1200 Field trip

Fossils with Aaron O’Dea

Lunch in the field

1400–1700 Topic 3

1400–1430

Raquel Peixoto & Luis Mejia on Probiotics/BMMO (title TBA; confirmed)

1440–1540

Break-out groups

3A: What can microbiology do for conservation?

1540–1640

Report and discuss ideas

1640–1700 Break

1700–1900 Topic 4

With refreshments

1700–1715

Introduction to Topic 4 (Laetitia/Matt/Jarrod)

1715–1815

Break-out groups

4A: On what taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional groups should future studies on symbiosis be focusing and why?

1815–1900

Report and discuss ideas

1900– Happy hour & Dinner

References

Previous
Next